Community Service Club to host Empty Bowl for 17th year

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Community Service Club to host Empty Bowl for 17th year

Students in the Culinary 3 class prepare soup for the event.

Students in the Culinary 3 class prepare soup for the event.

Sophie Levine

Students in the Culinary 3 class prepare soup for the event.

Sophie Levine

Sophie Levine

Students in the Culinary 3 class prepare soup for the event.

Meredith Herrick, News Editor

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$5000.

Community Service Club aims to raise to fight hunger in Evanston by collaborating with culinary and ceramics for the seventeenth annual Empty Bowl on Dec. 6.

“A girl from Senior Studies said she heard about empty bowls and asked if we could do it here at ETHS,” Community Service Coordinator Mary Collins said. “That was 16 years ago.”

Empty Bowl is an annual event held in South Study Cafe during all lunch periods. It costs $5 for lunch only and $10 for lunch and a bowl. All of the money raised goes to local soup kitchens and pantries to help fight hunger in Evanston. There will also be a silent auction which will include pieces done by ceramics students and local artists.

The event is planned by the Community Service Club. While the culinary class makes the majority of the food, Community Service members reach out to restaurants and other businesses to see if they are willing to donate food.

“We’re all equals in this project,” Collins said. “We want to involve as many people as possible, and for the fundraising we want to feed as many people as possible.”

Community Service is donating to Hillside Food Pantry, Soup At Six, Interfaith Action Network, Campus Kitchens, and Harvest Food Pantry. There goal to raise around $5000, and with that money they can feed up to 2500 people.

“It’s fun but sometimes it can be challenging [to make the food] because we have to make a lot of difficult dishes” senior culinary student Jazlyn Clarke said.

Students in ceramics make the bowls and participated in Bowl-a-Thon on Nov. 11. The event aims to make 100, but every student in each class also makes a bowl to donate. In total, there is anywhere from 200 to 300 bowls.

“It’s a pretty huge event for us,” Ceramics teacher Marla Seibold said. “It’s is a way to talk about activism and community through art.”