Embracing their roots: It’s a natural black hair movement

Jacaree Masupha, senior; Anthony Calhon, senior; Jayson Sawyer, junior;
Ross Bostick, senior; Zion Waite, junior; Adama Diakhate, junior.

Jesse Bond

Jacaree Masupha, senior; Anthony Calhon, senior; Jayson Sawyer, junior; Ross Bostick, senior; Zion Waite, junior; Adama Diakhate, junior.

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The natural look.

At ETHS, black males are embracing their natural hair by wearing hairstyles that show their natural curls, as well as experimenting with color.

From twists to curly ‘fros to box fades, black males are wearing their unique hair to match their personalities and reflect their African roots.

“I find it important to individualize myself from my culture by wearing a natural hairstyle that suits me,” says freshman Jonathan Mack.

According to Jonathan he mainly chose his hairstyle, the curly afro, because it was easy to manage and it would express his personality to others.

“As a black male at ETHS, it is very important to have your own look and wear what looks and feels good for you,” says freshman Shawn Johnson.

These hairstyles not only show personality, they also allow black males to embrace their African roots and express their positive attributes.

“Back in the old days, black males would wear their hair in a natural style to separate themselves from others and make themselves look stronger,” Jonathan says.

Popular culture is also aiding in this trend. Within the past year, Odell Beckham Jr., a wide-receiver for the New York Giants in the NFL, has captured the attention of black males across the nation. Beckham wears a natural hairstyle with caramel-blonde highlights, changing the perception of how black males can wear their hair.

This natural hair trend is not just a popular cultural movement; it reflects the changing political landscape of our country, showing black males’ resilience to the cultural oppression they have faced in the past.